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BS-2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers Sept 2016 Release : N Scale : Coming Spring 2017

Announced September 13th 2016
Best Price Deadline is October 26th 2016
ETA is Spring 2017

The story of these 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers begins in 1942 when the War Production Board directed car builders to substitute wood for steel wherever possible in car superstructures. The familiar 2-bay “war emergency” composite hopper was a result of this directive. Those cars had wooden side sheets and end slope sheets (although the middle slope sheets remained steel.) This saved a bit over two and a half tons of steel needed elsewhere for the war effort. Unfortunately, the wood boards were considerably thicker than steel sheet which effectively lowered the cubic capacity of the car. While you could build ten composite hoppers with the steel of nine all-steel hoppers, the lower capacity of the composite cars meant you needed more composite cars to carry the same load. During 1944, the directive was set aside and cars that were on order were delivered with the familiar diagonal bracing but with all steel construction. After the war, as composite cars came due for serious maintenance, the wood side and slope sheets were replaced with steel. A large majority of the composite cars were rebuilt in this manner sometime during the 1950s. 

  • Retail Price:  
  • Current Price:  
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BS-64000 Undecorated 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hopper : N Scale : Coming Spring 2017

BS-64000 Undecorated 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hopper

Undecorated cars are unpainted plastic.

The story of these 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers begins in 1942 when the War Production Board directed car builders to substitute wood for steel wherever possible in car superstructures. The familiar 2-bay “war emergency” composite hopper was a result of this directive. Those cars had wooden side sheets and end slope sheets (although the middle slope sheets remained steel.) This saved a bit over two and a half tons of steel needed elsewhere for the war effort. Unfortunately, the wood boards were considerably thicker than steel sheet which effectively lowered the cubic capacity of the car. While you could build ten composite hoppers with the steel of nine all-steel hoppers, the lower capacity of the composite cars meant you needed more composite cars to carry the same load. During 1944, the directive was set aside and cars that were on order were delivered with the familiar diagonal bracing but with all steel construction. After the war, as composite cars came due for serious maintenance, the wood side and slope sheets were replaced with steel. A large majority of the composite cars were rebuilt in this manner sometime during the 1950s. 

Announced September 13th 2016
Best Price Deadline is October 26th 2016
ETA is Spring 2017
 

  • Retail Price: $24.95 
  • Current Price: $19.96 
  • Qty:

BS-64011 B&O 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hopper : N Scale : Coming Spring 2017

BS-64011 B&O 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hopper

Baltimore & Ohio (13 Great States) - 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers

Baltimore & Ohio began rebuilding their composite hoppers in quantity in 1955. Although the “13 Great States” version of the B&O logo had largely been retired, the new large “B&O” lettering was a poor fit over the 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hopper’s diagonal ribs. As a result, the old stencils were used again on the rebuilt cars.

The story of these 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers begins in 1942 when the War Production Board directed car builders to substitute wood for steel wherever possible in car superstructures. The familiar 2-bay “war emergency” composite hopper was a result of this directive. Those cars had wooden side sheets and end slope sheets (although the middle slope sheets remained steel.) This saved a bit over two and a half tons of steel needed elsewhere for the war effort. Unfortunately, the wood boards were considerably thicker than steel sheet which effectively lowered the cubic capacity of the car. While you could build ten composite hoppers with the steel of nine all-steel hoppers, the lower capacity of the composite cars meant you needed more composite cars to carry the same load. During 1944, the directive was set aside and cars that were on order were delivered with the familiar diagonal bracing but with all steel construction. After the war, as composite cars came due for serious maintenance, the wood side and slope sheets were replaced with steel. A large majority of the composite cars were rebuilt in this manner sometime during the 1950s. 

Announced September 13th 2016
Best Price Deadline is October 26th 2016
ETA is Spring 2017
 

  • Retail Price: $24.95 
  • Current Price: $19.96 
  • Qty:

BS-64012 B&O 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hopper 2-pk : N Scale : Coming Spring 2017

BS-64012 B&O 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hopper 2-pk

Baltimore & Ohio (13 Great States) - 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers 2-pack

Baltimore & Ohio began rebuilding their composite hoppers in quantity in 1955. Although the “13 Great States” version of the B&O logo had largely been retired, the new large “B&O” lettering was a poor fit over the 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hopper’s diagonal ribs. As a result, the old stencils were used again on the rebuilt cars.

The story of these 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers begins in 1942 when the War Production Board directed car builders to substitute wood for steel wherever possible in car superstructures. The familiar 2-bay “war emergency” composite hopper was a result of this directive. Those cars had wooden side sheets and end slope sheets (although the middle slope sheets remained steel.) This saved a bit over two and a half tons of steel needed elsewhere for the war effort. Unfortunately, the wood boards were considerably thicker than steel sheet which effectively lowered the cubic capacity of the car. While you could build ten composite hoppers with the steel of nine all-steel hoppers, the lower capacity of the composite cars meant you needed more composite cars to carry the same load. During 1944, the directive was set aside and cars that were on order were delivered with the familiar diagonal bracing but with all steel construction. After the war, as composite cars came due for serious maintenance, the wood side and slope sheets were replaced with steel. A large majority of the composite cars were rebuilt in this manner sometime during the 1950s. 

Announced September 13th 2016
Best Price Deadline is October 26th 2016
ETA is Spring 2017
 

  • Retail Price: $49.90 
  • Current Price: $39.92 
  • Qty:

BS-64013 B&O 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hopper 3-pk : N Scale : Coming Spring 2017

BS-64013 B&O 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hopper 3-pk

Baltimore & Ohio (13 Great States) - 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers 3-pack

Baltimore & Ohio began rebuilding their composite hoppers in quantity in 1955. Although the “13 Great States” version of the B&O logo had largely been retired, the new large “B&O” lettering was a poor fit over the 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hopper’s diagonal ribs. As a result, the old stencils were used again on the rebuilt cars.

The story of these 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers begins in 1942 when the War Production Board directed car builders to substitute wood for steel wherever possible in car superstructures. The familiar 2-bay “war emergency” composite hopper was a result of this directive. Those cars had wooden side sheets and end slope sheets (although the middle slope sheets remained steel.) This saved a bit over two and a half tons of steel needed elsewhere for the war effort. Unfortunately, the wood boards were considerably thicker than steel sheet which effectively lowered the cubic capacity of the car. While you could build ten composite hoppers with the steel of nine all-steel hoppers, the lower capacity of the composite cars meant you needed more composite cars to carry the same load. During 1944, the directive was set aside and cars that were on order were delivered with the familiar diagonal bracing but with all steel construction. After the war, as composite cars came due for serious maintenance, the wood side and slope sheets were replaced with steel. A large majority of the composite cars were rebuilt in this manner sometime during the 1950s. 

Announced September 13th 2016
Best Price Deadline is October 26th 2016
ETA is Spring 2017
 

  • Retail Price: $74.85 
  • Current Price: $59.88 
  • Qty:

BS-64021 Clinchfield 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hopper : N Scale : Coming Spring 2017

BS-64021 Clinchfield 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hopper

Clinchfield Railroad - 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers

Clinchfield Railroad rebuilt their composite hoppers in 1957. Although the Clinchfield was just 300 miles long, they had an impressive fleet of nearly 500 of these 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers. Clinchfield’s coal traffic was significant but less known was the industrial mineral traffic including feldspar, mica and even landscaping gravel generated on the southern half of the railroad.

The story of these 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers begins in 1942 when the War Production Board directed car builders to substitute wood for steel wherever possible in car superstructures. The familiar 2-bay “war emergency” composite hopper was a result of this directive. Those cars had wooden side sheets and end slope sheets (although the middle slope sheets remained steel.) This saved a bit over two and a half tons of steel needed elsewhere for the war effort. Unfortunately, the wood boards were considerably thicker than steel sheet which effectively lowered the cubic capacity of the car. While you could build ten composite hoppers with the steel of nine all-steel hoppers, the lower capacity of the composite cars meant you needed more composite cars to carry the same load. During 1944, the directive was set aside and cars that were on order were delivered with the familiar diagonal bracing but with all steel construction. After the war, as composite cars came due for serious maintenance, the wood side and slope sheets were replaced with steel. A large majority of the composite cars were rebuilt in this manner sometime during the 1950s. 

Announced September 13th 2016
Best Price Deadline is October 26th 2016
ETA is Spring 2017
 

  • Retail Price: $24.95 
  • Current Price: $19.96 
  • Qty:

BS-64022 Clinchfield 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hopper 2-pk : N Scale : Coming Spring 2017

BS-64022 Clinchfield 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hopper 2-pk

Clinchfield Railroad - 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers 2-pack

Clinchfield Railroad rebuilt their composite hoppers in 1957. Although the Clinchfield was just 300 miles long, they had an impressive fleet of nearly 500 of these 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers. Clinchfield’s coal traffic was significant but less known was the industrial mineral traffic including feldspar, mica and even landscaping gravel generated on the southern half of the railroad.

The story of these 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers begins in 1942 when the War Production Board directed car builders to substitute wood for steel wherever possible in car superstructures. The familiar 2-bay “war emergency” composite hopper was a result of this directive. Those cars had wooden side sheets and end slope sheets (although the middle slope sheets remained steel.) This saved a bit over two and a half tons of steel needed elsewhere for the war effort. Unfortunately, the wood boards were considerably thicker than steel sheet which effectively lowered the cubic capacity of the car. While you could build ten composite hoppers with the steel of nine all-steel hoppers, the lower capacity of the composite cars meant you needed more composite cars to carry the same load. During 1944, the directive was set aside and cars that were on order were delivered with the familiar diagonal bracing but with all steel construction. After the war, as composite cars came due for serious maintenance, the wood side and slope sheets were replaced with steel. A large majority of the composite cars were rebuilt in this manner sometime during the 1950s. 

Announced September 13th 2016
Best Price Deadline is October 26th 2016
ETA is Spring 2017
 

  • Retail Price: $49.90 
  • Current Price: $39.92 
  • Qty:

BS-64023 Clinchfield 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hopper 3-pk : N Scale : Coming Spring 2017

BS-64023 Clinchfield 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hopper 3-pk

Clinchfield Railroad - 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers 3-pack

Clinchfield Railroad rebuilt their composite hoppers in 1957. Although the Clinchfield was just 300 miles long, they had an impressive fleet of nearly 500 of these 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers. Clinchfield’s coal traffic was significant but less known was the industrial mineral traffic including feldspar, mica and even landscaping gravel generated on the southern half of the railroad.

The story of these 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers begins in 1942 when the War Production Board directed car builders to substitute wood for steel wherever possible in car superstructures. The familiar 2-bay “war emergency” composite hopper was a result of this directive. Those cars had wooden side sheets and end slope sheets (although the middle slope sheets remained steel.) This saved a bit over two and a half tons of steel needed elsewhere for the war effort. Unfortunately, the wood boards were considerably thicker than steel sheet which effectively lowered the cubic capacity of the car. While you could build ten composite hoppers with the steel of nine all-steel hoppers, the lower capacity of the composite cars meant you needed more composite cars to carry the same load. During 1944, the directive was set aside and cars that were on order were delivered with the familiar diagonal bracing but with all steel construction. After the war, as composite cars came due for serious maintenance, the wood side and slope sheets were replaced with steel. A large majority of the composite cars were rebuilt in this manner sometime during the 1950s. 

Announced September 13th 2016
Best Price Deadline is October 26th 2016
ETA is Spring 2017
 

  • Retail Price: $74.85 
  • Current Price: $59.88 
  • Qty:

BS-64031 Santa Fe 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hopper : N Scale : Coming Spring 2017

BS-64031 Santa Fe 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hopper

Santa Fe - 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers

Santa Fe rebuilt their fleet of composite hoppers with steel sides at their Topeka Shops in 1957 and 1958. The fleet included 400 cars split between two classes. In addition to hauling coal, Santa Fe hoppers in this era also carried coke, stone and various ores. Some of these cars were still in revenue service in the 1980s.

The story of these 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers begins in 1942 when the War Production Board directed car builders to substitute wood for steel wherever possible in car superstructures. The familiar 2-bay “war emergency” composite hopper was a result of this directive. Those cars had wooden side sheets and end slope sheets (although the middle slope sheets remained steel.) This saved a bit over two and a half tons of steel needed elsewhere for the war effort. Unfortunately, the wood boards were considerably thicker than steel sheet which effectively lowered the cubic capacity of the car. While you could build ten composite hoppers with the steel of nine all-steel hoppers, the lower capacity of the composite cars meant you needed more composite cars to carry the same load. During 1944, the directive was set aside and cars that were on order were delivered with the familiar diagonal bracing but with all steel construction. After the war, as composite cars came due for serious maintenance, the wood side and slope sheets were replaced with steel. A large majority of the composite cars were rebuilt in this manner sometime during the 1950s. 

Announced September 13th 2016
Best Price Deadline is October 26th 2016
ETA is Spring 2017

  • Retail Price: $24.95 
  • Current Price: $19.96 
  • Qty:

BS-64032 Santa Fe 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hopper 2-pk : N Scale : Coming Spring 2017

BS-64032 Santa Fe 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hopper 2-pk

Santa Fe - 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers 2-pack

Santa Fe rebuilt their fleet of composite hoppers with steel sides at their Topeka Shops in 1957 and 1958. The fleet included 400 cars split between two classes. In addition to hauling coal, Santa Fe hoppers in this era also carried coke, stone and various ores. Some of these cars were still in revenue service in the 1980s.

The story of these 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers begins in 1942 when the War Production Board directed car builders to substitute wood for steel wherever possible in car superstructures. The familiar 2-bay “war emergency” composite hopper was a result of this directive. Those cars had wooden side sheets and end slope sheets (although the middle slope sheets remained steel.) This saved a bit over two and a half tons of steel needed elsewhere for the war effort. Unfortunately, the wood boards were considerably thicker than steel sheet which effectively lowered the cubic capacity of the car. While you could build ten composite hoppers with the steel of nine all-steel hoppers, the lower capacity of the composite cars meant you needed more composite cars to carry the same load. During 1944, the directive was set aside and cars that were on order were delivered with the familiar diagonal bracing but with all steel construction. After the war, as composite cars came due for serious maintenance, the wood side and slope sheets were replaced with steel. A large majority of the composite cars were rebuilt in this manner sometime during the 1950s. 

Announced September 13th 2016
Best Price Deadline is October 26th 2016
ETA is Spring 2017

  • Retail Price: $49.90 
  • Current Price: $39.92 
  • Qty:

BS-64033 Santa Fe 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hopper 3-pk : N Scale : Coming Spring 2017

BS-64033 Santa Fe 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hopper 3-pk

Santa Fe - 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers 3-pack

Santa Fe rebuilt their fleet of composite hoppers with steel sides at their Topeka Shops in 1957 and 1958. The fleet included 400 cars split between two classes. In addition to hauling coal, Santa Fe hoppers in this era also carried coke, stone and various ores. Some of these cars were still in revenue service in the 1980s.

The story of these 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers begins in 1942 when the War Production Board directed car builders to substitute wood for steel wherever possible in car superstructures. The familiar 2-bay “war emergency” composite hopper was a result of this directive. Those cars had wooden side sheets and end slope sheets (although the middle slope sheets remained steel.) This saved a bit over two and a half tons of steel needed elsewhere for the war effort. Unfortunately, the wood boards were considerably thicker than steel sheet which effectively lowered the cubic capacity of the car. While you could build ten composite hoppers with the steel of nine all-steel hoppers, the lower capacity of the composite cars meant you needed more composite cars to carry the same load. During 1944, the directive was set aside and cars that were on order were delivered with the familiar diagonal bracing but with all steel construction. After the war, as composite cars came due for serious maintenance, the wood side and slope sheets were replaced with steel. A large majority of the composite cars were rebuilt in this manner sometime during the 1950s. 

Announced September 13th 2016
Best Price Deadline is October 26th 2016
ETA is Spring 2017

  • Retail Price: $74.85 
  • Current Price: $59.88 
  • Qty:

BS-64041 Southern 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hopper : N Scale : Coming Spring 2017

BS-64041 Southern 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hopper

Southern Railway System - 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers

Southern Railway System acquired 1,450 composite hoppers during the war and rebuilt them into all steel cars in the 1950s. The block lettering was adopted in 1960. While many railroads went to great lengths to break up their lettering to avoid the vertical and diagonal ribs on these cars, Southern made stencils that carefully wrapped over the ribs. By 1969, the fleet had all been equipped with ACI tags.

The story of these 2-Bay Rebuilt War Emergency Hoppers begins in 1942 when the War Production Board directed car builders to substitute wood for steel wherever possible in car superstructures. The familiar 2-bay “war emergency” composite hopper was a result of this directive. Those cars had wooden side sheets and end slope sheets (although the middle slope sheets remained steel.) This saved a bit over two and a half tons of steel needed elsewhere for the war effort. Unfortunately, the wood boards were considerably thicker than steel sheet which effectively lowered the cubic capacity of the car. While you could build ten composite hoppers with the steel of nine all-steel hoppers, the lower capacity of the composite cars meant you needed more composite cars to carry the same load. During 1944, the directive was set aside and cars that were on order were delivered with the familiar diagonal bracing but with all steel construction. After the war, as composite cars came due for serious maintenance, the wood side and slope sheets were replaced with steel. A large majority of the composite cars were rebuilt in this manner sometime during the 1950s. 

Announced September 13th 2016
Best Price Deadline is October 26th 2016
ETA is Spring 2017
 

  • Retail Price: $24.95 
  • Current Price: $19.96 
  • Qty: